Systems of mating and other papers

  • 215 Pages
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by
The Iowa State College Press , Ames, Iowa
Heredity, Gen
Statementby Sewall Wright.
The Physical Object
Pagination215 p. (in various pagings) :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23364908M
ISBN 100813823153

Description Systems of mating and other papers FB2

Systems of Mating and Other Papers Paperback – January 1, by Sewall Wright (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ — $ Paperback, January 1, — — $ Spiral-bound "Please retry"Author: Sewall Wright.

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Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ — $ Author: Sewall Wright. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Wright, Sewall, Systems of mating and other papers. Ames, Iowa, The Iowa State College Press []. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Wright, Sewall, Systems of mating and other papers.

[s.l.: s.n.], (OCoLC) Document Type. This book presents the first unified conceptual and statistical framework for understanding the evolution of reproductive strategies.

Using the concept of the opportunity for sexual selection, the authors illustrate how and why sexual selection, though restricted to one sex and opposed in the other, is one of the strongest and fastest of all evolutionary forces. Comparative analyses of the anatomy, reproductive physiology, and behaviour of extant primates and other mammals can offer important insights into the origins of human sexual behaviour, allowing us to reconstruct the origins of human mating systems, the evolution of sexual attractiveness, patterns of mate choice, and copulatory behaviour.

A mating system is a reflection of the distribution and pattern of reproduction across individuals of a social group. Primates show remarkable diversity in the types of mating systems exhibited. Animal mating systems are exceptionally diverse, and considerable effort has been undertaken to document and describe variation in mating systems among taxonomic groups, to identify the factors.

Mating systems in species that show male-to-female sex change should create situations where female fertility tends to be more strongly dependent on size than is male fertility. Unfortunately, the mating systems of most protandrous sex changers are not well described. For those species in which the mating system Systems of mating and other papers book known, matings tend to occur in very small groups (tending toward monogamy), as.

Harem mating systems had less than 40% of unmated males are on the water (usually 1 male out of 3) and 33% or more of the females (usually 2 or all 3 out of 3) on the water. This project did not involve vertebrate animals and thus did not require an IACUC protocol.

Nonetheless, all methods met the ABS/ASAB guidelines for ethical treatment of. Start studying Mating Systems. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Klug, in Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Biology, Categorizing mating systems qualitatively (e.g., monogamy, polyandry, polygyny, polygamy) provides insight into the general mating dynamics that are occurring in a given population or species.

However, qualitative descriptors of mating systems have been criticized as being too vague (e.g., Shuster and Wade, ). First published inthis book examines the causes and consequences of different mating patterns in man with particular reference to biological, medical and demographic factors.

Although the effects of inbreeding on genetic structure and gene frequencies have been well covered in the medical genetics literature, and specific social systems have been described in social anthropology texts.

Mammalian mating systems are predominantly polygynous, in part because young develop within and are then nursed by the female. In polyandry (andros means "male"), some females mate with more than one male during the breeding season.

This is the rarest type of mating system. The study of mating systems is the study of the behavioral, physiological, and ecological factors that underlie predict­ able patterns of male and female interactions during repro­ duction.

Much of the literature on mating systems emphasizes male-male competition and its effects on male morphology and behavior. However, fertilization suc­. Polygyny is is a mating system in which one male gets mating rights to multiple females. This is much more common and is found in 90% of mammals, including deer, tigers, gorillas, and elephant seals.

An aspect of mating systems to keep in mind is that, although there can be pair bonds where both sexes are monogamous, polygamous or promiscuous, there are many more examples of mating systems/behaviors where one sex exhibits one type of mating system, and the other sex exhibits another type of mating system.

Mating system theory, based on economics of territorial defense, has been applied to describe the diversity in social systems across taxa. Mating systems play a critical role in genetic, demographic, and social dynamics of populations. Early models explaining mating system diversity emphasized links between resource and mate monopolization.

On the Evolution of Mating Systems in Birds and Mammals. Gordon H. Orians; polygyny should evolve more readily among species in which clutch size is strongly influenced by factors other than the ability of the adults to provide food for the young.

Most cases of polygyny in birds, a group in which monogamy is the most common mating pattern. Mating systems (1) were first dis-cussed in evolutionary terms by Darwin (2).

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Since then, major developments in genetic theory have allowed a better un-derstanding of sex ratios, sexual di-morphism, and differential patterns of parental care (). Important mile-stones toward an ecological understand-ing of mating systems have also been.

The Evolution of Insect Mating Systems Edited by David Shuker and Leigh Simmons. Integrates across taxa and sub-disciplines of biological research to produce a text that will motivate research in this rapidly developing area and bring insect mating strategies to a wider audience interested in the evolution of behaviour more generally.

The study of mating is one of the most active areas in evolutionary ecology. What fuels this research is curiosity about a stunning diversity of ways in which zygotes are formed. Many plants and some animals can reproduce without combining gametes. Many other plants combine gametes but do so within the same individual (selfing).

Still other plants and animals require a gamete from another. About this book. Mating Systems and Strategies presents the first unified conceptual and statistical framework for understanding the evolution of reproductive strategies.

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Using the concept of the opportunity for sexual selection, the authors illustrate how and why sexual selection, though restricted to one sex and opposed in the other, is one of the strongest and fastest of all evolutionary. Author of books: Systems of Mating and Other Papers () Genetic and Biometric Foundations () Evolution and the Genetics of Populations (, four volumes) Experimental Results and Evolutionary Deductions () Variability Within and Among Natural Populations () Evolution: Selected Papers ()Born:   Mating Systems.

Three general mating systems, all involving innate as opposed to learned behaviors, are seen in animal populations: monogamous (monogamy), polygynous (polygyny), and polyandrous (polyandry).

In monogamous systems, one male and one female are paired for at least one breeding season. The term mating system refers to the way in which individuals are grouped in relation to mating.

It can also refer to the way in show more content The second and third is to account and describe explanations for the different kinds of variation present in these systems, along with the attempting to locate the factors that are responsible.

Although the book contains chapters such as "The Evolution of Animal Mating Systems" and "The Biological Basis of Human Patterns of Mating and Marriage" I chose primarily to devote much of the focus of this essay to the latter chapters of the book ("The Social Anthropology of Marriage and Mating" and "Mating, the Family, and Marriage: A Sociological View").

A mating system is a way in which a group is structured in relation to sexual behaviour. The precise meaning depends upon the context. With respect to animals, the term describes which males and females mate under which circumstances.

Recognised systems include monogamy, polygamy (which includes polygyny, polyandry, and polygynandry), and promiscuity, all of which lead to different mate. of the penis. It rotates and sprays semen during mating. The reproductive system of the fowl, however, differs in form and function from the other domestic animals covered in this lesson.

Testicles – As in the other animals, sperm and hormones are produced in the testicles. In. Animal sexual behaviour takes many different forms, including within the same mating or reproductively motivated systems include monogamy, polygyny, polyandry, polygamy and sexual behaviour may be reproductively motivated (e.g.

sex apparently due to duress or coercion and situational sexual behaviour) or non-reproductively motivated (e.g. interspecific.

complete, accurate, and integrated understanding of avian mating systems will be possible. Over the past 20 years, students of avian mating systems have gone from the conviction that more than 90% of all bird species are faithfully monogamous (Lack ) to an awareness that bird mating systems are not so straightforward.dispersal and mating abilities, a deme may correspond to the entire species or to a subpopulation restricted to a small local region.

The Hardy-Weinberg model assumes one particular system of mating – random mating – but many other systems of mating exist.mating systems. It is not surprising that the mating system of the well-known cosmopolitan species D.

melanogaster has been more extensively described than that of other Drosophila species (see Gromko et al. ). It was not until recently that a systematic study of .